11 Honda Civic Statistics You Should Know (Facts & Numbers)

The Honda Civic is one of the oldest and longest-standing Honda models.

It has featured in racing completions and is present in every continent across the globe. The Civic has received several accolades in almost 50 years of its existence.

Since its inception, Honda has sold over 20 million Civics worldwide, cementing its place as one of the world’s top-selling vehicles.

In this article, we look at the Honda Civic’s stats and numbers.

How Many Honda Civics Have Been Sold Per Year in the U.S.?

The Honda Civic is one of the most popular and commercially successful Honda models in the U.S. Honda has sold over 8 million Civics in the U.S. since its debut.

Below is a breakdown of yearly sales of the Honda Civic and its hybrid variant which was discontinued in 2015.

Year Sales Sales (Hybrid)
1973 32,575  
1974 43,119  
1975 102,389  
1976 132,286  
1977 147,638  
1978 154,035  
1979 155,541  
1980 138,740  
1981 154,698  
1982 132,469  
1983 137,747  
1984 184,846  
1985 208,031  
1986 235,801  
1987 221,252  
1988 225,543  
1989 235,452  
1990 261,502  
1991 232,690  
1992 219,228  
1993 255,579  
1994 267,023  
1995 289,435  
1996 286,350  
1997 321,144  
1998 335,110  
1999 318,309  
2000 324,528  
2001 331,780  
2002 313,159 13,700
2003 299,672 21,800
2004 309,196 25,571
2005 308,415 25,864
2006 316,638 31,251
2007 331,095 32,575
2008 339,289 31,297
2009 259,722 15,119
2010 260,218 7,336
2011 221,235 4,703
2012 317,909 7,156
2013 336,180 7,719
2014 325,981 5,070
2015 335,384  
2016 366,927  
2017 377,266  
2018 325,760  
2019 325,650  
2020 261,225  

As of 2020, 12,015,761 Honda Civics and 229,161 hybrid variants have been sold in the United States.

The Civic’s highest sales year came in 2017 with a total sales figure of 377,266. In 2019, the Honda Civic was named the second best-selling car in the United States after the Toyota Camry.

Please also read our article about the Honda Civic and keys.

What Year Did Honda Start the Honda Civic?

Honda started producing and marketing the Honda Civic in 1972; that year also marked the start of its first generation.

The second generation started in 1979; the third generation in 1983; the fourth generation in 1987; the fifth generation in 1991; and the sixth generation in 1995.

The seventh generation began with the compact style in the year 2000.

The eighth generation debuted in 2005; the ninth generation in 2011 and the 10th generation in 2015. The Honda Civic is currently in its 11th generation which started in 2021.

How Is the Fuel Economy on Honda Civic?

Honda Civics have a decent fuel economy, depending on the trim level and engine type.

Of course, the hybrid models consume even less but they have been discontinued since 2015.

So let’s compare the Honda Civic’s fuel economy with that of its competitors.

The table below shows the vehicles’ Highway MPG, City MPG, and combined MPG.

Model City MPG Highway MPG Combined MPG
Honda Civic 5Dr 4cyl, 1.5l, Manual 6-spd 29 37 32
Honda Civic 5Dr 4cyl, 1.5l, Automatic(variable gear ratios) 31 40 34
Honda Civic 5Dr 4cyl, 1.5l, Automatic (AV-S7) 29 35 32
Honda Civic 5Dr 4cyl, 2.0l, Manual 6spd 22 28 25
Honda Civic 4Dr 4cyl, 1.5l, Automatic (AV-S7) 30 38 33
Honda Civic 4Dr 4cyl, 1.5l, Automatic (variable gear ratios) 32 42 36
Honda Civic 4Dr 4cyl, 2.0l, Automatic (AV-S7) 29 37 32
Honda civic 4Dr 4cyl, 2.0l, Automatic (variable gear ratios) 30 38 33
Nissan Sentra 2.0L 4cyl, Automatic (variable gear ratios) 29 39 33
Toyota Corolla 1.8l, 4cyl, Automatic (variable gear ratios) 30 38 33
Hyundai Elantra 2.0l, 4cyl, Automatic (AV-S1) 31 41 35

The table above shows that the four-door, automatic Honda Civic 1.5L (variable gear ratios) is the most fuel-efficient variant. When stacked up with its competitors, this variant takes the upper hand.

Less fuel-efficient trim levels are also not far behind, except the manual five-door Honda Civic which has a very low fuel economy. Overall, the Honda Civic has an excellent fuel efficiency for its class.

Make sure to also read our article about how long the Honda Civic lasts.

How Quickly Do Honda Civic Depreciate?

According to Car Edge, the Honda Civic will decline in value by 37% after five years. This would mean that if you get a new Honda Civic for $21,250, the value would likely drop to about $13,387 in five years.

AutoPadre forecasts a 43% depreciation rate in 5 years, which is still relatively slow. These percentages show just how slowly the Honda Civic depreciates. Little wonder, the Civic made Investopedia’s 2019 lists of cars that depreciate the least.

Did Honda Recall Any of the Civic Models?

Honda has recalled its Civic models several times over the years.

Below is a table that highlights the number of recalls for each Honda Civic model year 1992:

Model Year Number of Recalls
1992 13
1993 13
1994 14
1995 12
1996 17
1997 16
1998 18
1999 15
2000 18
2001 32
2002 29
2003 29
2004 20
2005 18
2006 17
2007 11
2008 10
2009 11
2010 11
2011 11
2012 3
2014 1
2015 1
2016 3
2017 5
2018 4
2019 2
2020 1

Honda Civic models have been recalled more times than most other Honda models. The 2001 to 2004 models have the highest recalls so far with 20 or more.

The 2001 model has had the highest recalls so far with 32 recalls.

Also read our article about the Honda Civic in snow and winter driving.

How Much Does the Honda Civic Pollute?

Honda Civics aren’t as environment-friendly as hybrid cars but they pollute less than many other vehicles.

The Turbo 4dr automatic Honda Civic, which is also the most fuel-efficient variant has a greenhouse gas emissions rate of  248 grams per mile.

It also emits 3.7 metric tons of gas per year and has an energy impact score of 9.2 barrels.

On average, all trim levels of the Honda Civic emit less than 4.0 metric tons per year (266 grams per year).

How Much Can the Civic Models Tow?

The 2021 Honda Civic weighs in at 2,947pounds maximum.

It can tow about 1,763 lbs. Note that these compact vehicles are not ideal for towing. If you do a lot of towing, we suggest getting a pickup or SUV.

How Reliable Is a Honda Civic?

U.S. News & World Report give the Honda Civic a weighted average rating of 8.6 out of a possible 10. J.D. Power gives it a reliability rating of 80 out of 100 based on reviews from thousands of owners.

Meanwhile, RepairPal rates the Civic a stellar 4.5 out of 5 and ranks it 3rd out of 36 vehicles in the compact segment.

Based on these overwhelmingly positive ratings, we can say the Honda Civic is reliable.

How Safe Is a Honda Civic?

The Honda Civic has also been frequently praised for its top-tier safety features.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration gives the 2021 Civic five-star ratings in rollover, frontal crash, and side crash situations.

Further, Institute For Highway Safety Administration gives the Civic a “Good” in all categories, except Headlights where it was rated “Poor.”

U.S. News & World Report also give it a 9.7 over 10 safety rating. These mostly positive ratings are testament to the Honda Civic’s safety.

What Is the Typical Buyer Demographic for this Model?

According to a 2017 survey conducted by J.D. Power, 58% of Civic buyers are men.

The report also suggests that people born between 1977 and 1994 made up 43% of Civic buyers and 36% were Gen Z.

The study also reveals that a large proportion of Civic owners have a higher average household income compared to the median for the segment.

Buyers in this demographic consider price and practicality when choosing a car. They also want their cars to be stylish and want a versatile vehicle for their busy schedules.

Honda Civic Theft Numbers

The Honda Civic tops several yearly lists of most stolen cars in the United States, a testament to its popularity even among car thieves.

In 2019, the 2000 Honda Civic was stolen 4,731 times, putting it comfortably atop the list of most stolen cars. The 1997 and 1998 Civic models have also been stolen very frequently in the past decade.

References

2017 Honda Civic Review | jdpower.com

2021 Honda Civic Safety | cars.usnews.com

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