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How Long Do Chevrolet Equinox Last? (Solved & Explained!)

The Chevrolet Equinox is an all-round compact SUV that performs well in many aspects.

The cabin is roomy and comfortable; the infotainment system is advanced, yet easy to use; and the safety features are top notch.

In this article, we consider the longevity of the Chevrolet Equinox to see if it is a worthy long-term investment.

Here is the short answer to how long Chevrolet Equinox lasts:

Chevrolet Equinox models have been reported to last 150,000 to 200,000 miles with regular servicing and prompt repairs. Based on the national average of miles driven per year (15,000 miles), a Chevrolet Equinox can last 10 to 13 years.

How Many Miles Can You Expect from a Chevrolet Equinox?

While Chevrolet doesn’t have a reputation for reliability, it makes some reliable models, and the Equinox is one of them.

Depending on various factors, you can expect up to 200,000 miles from a Chevrolet Equinox.

Consumer Reports says the average car lasts 200,000 miles, meaning the Equinox is as reliable as any other model out there.

As the Equinox is already reliable, you only need to maintain it well to get 200,000 miles or more from it.

Routine servicing, including oil changes, filter replacements, etc., are necessary if you hope to get your Chevrolet Equinox past 200,000 miles.

Many owners also recommend driving the Chevrolet Equinox carefully, as this will reduce wear.

How Soon Should You Expect Rust on a Chevrolet Equinox?

Rust affects virtually every vehicle, including the Chevrolet Equinox models.

Some owners report that the rust appears within two to four years of ownership. Conversely, some owners have reported getting rust around the eight to tenth year of ownership.

Where you live will have a big impact on how early rust sets in on your Chevrolet Equinox.

For example, we found that drivers living in the Northern parts of the United States had higher chances of getting rust.

Such areas are cold regions that experience snowfall for a large part of the year. And transport authorities spread rock salt on roads to prevent the snow from turning into ice.

Salt is naturally corrosive, so when vehicles drive over salted roads, rusting is inevitable.

A common rust-related issue on the Chevrolet Equinox is rusting around the doors.

From reports, the affected Equinox models have a design defect that encourages corrosion in the lower part of the doors.

The issue mostly affects Chevrolet Equinox models released between 2010 and 2014.

Although not as prevalent as door rust, frame rust is also common on the Chevrolet Equinox.

On CarProblemZoo, a vehicle complaints site, we found reports of acute corrosion on the frame of the Chevrolet Equinox.

In some cases, the entire subframe and rockers had rotted from rust, making the vehicles unsafe to drive.

How Long Do Chevrolet Equinox Last Compared to Similar Car Models?

We have established that the Chevrolet Equinox has the same lifespan as the average vehicle. But how does its lifespan compare with that of other compact SUVs?

We answer that question by measuring the Equinox’s longevity against similar models in the compact SUV segment:

Chevrolet Equinox vs. Mazda CX-5

The Mazda CX-5 is more reliable than the Chevrolet Equinox.

It gets a 4.5 reliability rating from RepairPal, while the Chevrolet Equinox gets a lowly 3.5 rating.

As such, it is not surprising that the Mazda CX-5 lasts longer than the Chevrolet Equinox.

With proper maintenance, you will get 200,000 miles out of a Chevrolet Equinox. Proper maintenance will get you over 250,000 miles from a Mazda CX-5.

Chevrolet Equinox vs. Honda CR-V

The Chevrolet Equinox cannot match the reliability of the Honda CR-V.

While 200,000 miles represents the lifespan of an Equinox, the Honda CR-V can go over 300,000 miles.

If you drive 15,000 miles in a year, that’s about six additional years of driving for you.

Chevrolet Equinox vs. Ford Escape

The average Ford Escape can last up to 250,000 miles with relative ease. This makes it better than the Chevrolet Equinox, whose maximum service life is about 200,000 miles.

However, the Chevrolet Equinox has cheaper maintenance costs than the Ford Escape.

According to estimates, you will spend an average of $537 in annual maintenance fees for the Equinox.

Maintenance on the Ford Escape costs more at $600 per year—that’s a difference of about $100.

In the end, the Chevrolet Equinox may be the more sensible long-term option, given its cheaper price of servicing.

Chevrolet Equinox vs. Toyota RAV4

Owners say the Toyota RAV4 can last between 250,000 to 300,000 miles.

This is around 50,000 miles higher than the maximum mileage offered by the Chevrolet Equinox (200,000 miles).

Moreover, the RAV4 has lower servicing costs ($429) when compared to the Equinox ($600).

Chevrolet Equinox vs. Subaru Forester

If you want a durable, compact SUV, the Subaru Forester is a better option than the Chevy Equinox.

The Forester guarantees a service life of 250,000 miles, about 50,000 miles higher than the Equinox’s 200,000-mile offering.

How Reliable Is a Chevrolet Equinox?

From our research, the Chevrolet Equinox models perform well in the reliability department.

Many users affirm that any Chevrolet Equinox model can stay in top shape for a long time with little repairs.

Despite these reports, the Chevrolet Equinox’s performance record on reliability rankings is mixed.

For example, RepairPal ranks it near the bottom of the compact SUV segment in terms of reliability. The Chevy Equinox gets a 3.5 reliability rating and ranks 23rd out of 26 models for reliability.

In contrast, J.D. Power gives the Equinox a top-of-the-pack rating for reliability. The 2019 model got a perfect five out of five reliability rating based on results of the J.D. Power Vehicle Dependability Study.

While reliability ratings are useful for judging reliability, they don’t matter all the time. Considering this, we’d recommend the Chevrolet Equinox as a reliable model, even with its checkered scorecard.

The Best and Worst Years for Chevrolet Equinox

According to Car Complaints, the worst year on record for the Chevrolet Equinox is the 2013 model year.

The 2013 model year actually doesn’t have the highest number of problems. However, it has the highest number of the costliest problems to fix among Equinox models.

The 2013 Chevrolet Equinox models faced various engine problems. A common engine problem was excessive oil consumption.

Owners said the engine of the affected models were prone to burning through oil at a rapid rate.

One user even said he had to use two bottles of engine oil for his car every two weeks because of this problem.

Research shows the excessive oil consumption issue occurred around 73,250 miles on the affected vehicles. Moreover, owners spent about $3,370 to fix the problem.

The 2019 Chevrolet Equinox has the lowest reported problems and is easily the best model year.

The 2019 model year comes with all-new features such as adaptive cruise control, pedestrian detection, and LED headlights, making it an attractive option for a used Chevy Equinox.

What About Recalls for These Models?

The Chevrolet Equinox has faced 17 recalls since it started production. To aid your buying decision, we have ranked each model year according to the number of recalls for it:

  • 2007: 4 recalls
  • 2018 4 recalls
  • 2010: 3 recalls
  • 2011: 3 recalls
  • 2012: 3 recalls
  • 2013: 2 recalls
  • 2005: 1 recall
  • 2016: 1 recall
  • 2019: 1 recall

Chevrolet Equinox Model Year List

Here are model years for the Chevrolet Equinox since its inception:

First Generation

  • 2005 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2006 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2007 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2008 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2009 Chevrolet Equinox

Second Generation

  • 2010 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2011 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2012 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2013 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2014 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2015 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2016 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2017 Chevrolet Equinox

Third Generation

  • 2018 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2019 Chevrolet Equinox
  • 2020 Chevrolet Equinox

Are Chevrolet Equinox Expensive to Maintain?

If Chevrolet Equinox will be your long-term car, be prepared to shell out a considerable amount for maintenance.

Data shows you’ll pay about $502 every year on average to service your Chevy Equinox.

While this isn’t particularly expensive (some cars cost more), it is higher than other compact SUVs.

How Long Do the Brakes Last?

Generally, the brakes have a lifespan that ranges between 30,000 miles to 60,000 miles.

Like every other component, how you use and maintain the brakes on your Chevy Equinox will determine how long they last.

How Long Do the Tires Last?

According to owners, the OEM tires on your Chevrolet Equinox should get between 30,000 to 50,000 miles before wearing out.

Don’t forget regular tire rotations will help extend the life of those tires.

How Long Do the Transmissions Last?

The transmission on the Chevy Equinox can last up to 120,000 miles with proper maintenance.

How Long Do the Spark Plugs Last?

Spark plugs on the Chevrolet Equinox have a service life of 100,000 miles. After 100k miles, you will need to replace the spark plugs.

What About Insurance Cost?

You’ll pay around $1,608 to keep your Chevrolet Equinox insured for a year. This means you’ll part with $134 in insurance payments for your Equinox SUV.

Tips to Prolong the Life of Your Chevrolet Equinox

Here are tips to help prolong the life of your Chevy Equinox:

  1. Rustproof your vehicle to prevent rusting, which can damage important components.
  2. As said earlier, consistent servicing is important to keeping your vehicle running for long. Do oil changes, filter changes, and other servicing as recommended.
  3. Don’t overload your vehicle, as this would strain components and cause them to fail.

Resources

https://repairpal.com/reliability/chevrolet/equinox.amp

https://www.cars.com/research/chevrolet-equinox/

https://m.carcomplaints.com/Chevrolet/Equinox/

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