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How Long Do Honda ST1100 & ST1300s Last? 3 Examples

From the year 1990 to 2013, Honda harbored the best kept secret in the industry-the ST1100 & ST1300.

The Honda ST series was revered by riders but yet it never seemed to win the recognition it deserved. Riders loved these bikes for their reliability, easy maintenance, and comfort. Read on to learn more about the longevity of the ST series bikes.

Here is the short answer to how long the ST1100 and ST1300 last:

Thanks to Honda’s exceptional engineering designs, its legendary reliability, and ease of maintenance, you can expect an ST1100 or ST1300 motorcycle to last up to 40,000 miles or more, which translates to about 10-13 years if you average 3,000 to 4,000 miles per year. 

How Long Do the ST1100 & ST1300 Last?

 The ST1100 ceased production in 2002 to be replaced by the ST1300, which stopped production in 2012.

Even though both the ST1100 and ST1300 have been discontinued by Honda for at least 19 and eight years respectively, several of these models are still on the road today and going strong. 

Keeping a bike running isn’t without a little money and elbow grease. Like any bike, longevity will depend on maintenance. Lucky for owners, the sport touring model from Honda has very simple maintenance upkeep. 

The ST’s maintenance schedule was very simple and had long intervals between services of many components. This made it simple for even the most forgetful or, albeit lazy, riders to keep up with oil changes and fluid flushes. 

After the initial 600-mile service, an oil change was the most frequent maintenance that needed to be tended to (every 4,000 miles) followed by changing spark plugs and flushing brake and clutch fluid every 12,000 miles. 

Performing these maintenance items was also simple and cheap to do.

The STs had far less fairing and body panels to remove, compared to Honda’s more popular touring model, The Gold Wing, and required little technical expertise. This is another reason why so many ST riders enjoyed owning these bikes. 

How Many Miles Do You Get on a Honda ST 1100 & 1300?

The ST1100 have an average lifespan of 40,000 miles. This model, however, is becoming rarer to find.

The ST1300, which replaced the ST100 in 2002, is still commonly found on the road today and has an average lifespan of 30,000 miles, but I would expect that number to expand over the next decade.

For a sport touring style motorcycle, this is great mileage!

Many sport touring bikes experience quite a bit of abuse and are not considered being as durable as true touring bikes.

The STs from Honda are an exception, with their mileage going northward of 30,000 miles. 

Please also read our article about common problems of the Honda ST1300

What Is Considered High Mileage for These Models?

Anything over 30,000 miles could be considered high mileage for the ST1100 and ST1300s. However many STs have surpassed the 30k threshold.  

In fact, over 1,400 ST1300s have been used in the Iron Butt Challenge, an endurance “race” that pushes the rider and their bike to the limit. There are several categories in the Iron Butt Challenge, all of which require serious miles per day.

One popular category for the ST1300 is the Slow Month Challenge, which requires riders to ride 30,000 miles in one month (30-31 days).

That’s 1,000 miles per day! To ride a motorcycle 1,000 a day requires some serious grit from not just the rider but the bike itself. Many problems can arise from pushing a bike to those types of limits but the ST1300 continues to prevail.

How Many Years Does a Honda ST 1100 & 1300 Typically Last?

The Honda ST1100 and ST1300 have lasted for nearly 30 years before reaching the end of their life spans. 

The ST1100 was only produced in the states from 1990 to 2002 then replaced with the ST1300, which also stopped in 2014. Over the last decade, the number of ST1100s still on the road has dwindled but many ST1300s can still be found carving canyons or touring highways. 

The ST1100s that remain are typically in fair condition with high miles. Since the 1100 was only made for 12 years (from 1990 to 2002), even the youngest STs are approaching a 20th anniversary. 

Is the Honda ST 1100 & 1300 Reliable?

True to the Honda legacy of innovation and durability, the ST1100 and ST1300 were known to be highly reliable and affordable motorcycles.

As a testament to their reliability, the ST1300 has been a popular contestant in the Iron Butt Challenge.

There are several divisions of the Iron Butt Challenge riders can participate in but each category, like the 30,000-mile challenge, requires serious miles that will push you, the rider, and your bike to the limit. 

Make sure to also read our article about how long the Honda Valkyrie lasts.

Does a Honda ST 1100 & 1300 Last Longer than Other Motorcycles?

While the STs are incredibly reliable and can, quite literally, go the distance, they are still a sport touring motorcycles and are not known to last as long as other touring models, like the Gold Wing. 

The STs are considered sport touring bikes and designed to be a happy medium between the youthful spirit of a CBR600 and the creature comforts of a Gold Wing.

While most of these bikes may not reach the 50, 60 or even 100,000-mile marker like the Gold Wing, they will most likely outlast the fast, but short-lived, sport bikes. 

What Typically Breaks First on a Honda ST 1100 & 1300?

The STs have had few problems throughout the years. But like any other aging vehicle, problems are bound to come up over time.

The most reported mechanical problem found on forums was the replacement of fuel pumps after the bike had reached high mileage. This isn’t too surprising though, as fuel pumps are known to go out over time. 

Be warned though that this will be one of the most costly and difficult maintenance jobs to perform on the ST series.

A new fuel pump from Honda for the STs will cost around $500. This is besides the additional two hours that an authorized dealership may charge at nearly $130 per hour. 

Also read our article about how long the Honda Shine lasts.

4 Great Tips to Make Sure Your Honda ST 1100 & 1300 Will Last Long

Here are tips to help you get a longer life out of your Honda ST 1100 or ST1300 bike:

1. Maintenance

The key to prolonging the life of any bike is to keep up with maintenance.

Skipping a maintenance appointment to avoid a high bill will only lead to more expensive problems down the road. Luckily, the STs have very simple and inexpensive upkeep. There’s really no reason not to follow maintenance. 

2. Storage

Keeping the bike stored in an enclosed space whenever possible is another great way to keep it looking new and prevent premature corrosion. 

Leaving your bike exposed to wind, dust, and the sun can not only make it look bad, but can also degrade your upholstery, controls, and wiring. 

If you don’t have access to a garage, try to keep it under covered parking or a weatherproof cover. 

3. Upgrade Accessories

Many ST riders have upgraded certain parts of the bike to make it comfier and last longer.

Common upgrades are the seat and windshield. Upgrading accessories may not necessarily make the bike last longer, but they will make you more comfortable and hold on to the bike longer. 

4. Ride it!

Bikes weren’t made to sit in the garage collecting dust.

Sitting bikes can break down and become inoperable. Debris and dirt in oil settle in the engine, fuel degrades and eats through plastic and tires dry out and crack.

To prevent these problems, be sure to make time to ride your bike regularly.

Final Thoughts 

The ST1100 and ST1300 may be discontinued by Honda but they are still excellent bikes for those who are seeking adventure.

They are also inexpensive with low-cost maintenance, making them a great bike for entry-level riders as well. 

These bikes are excellent choices for riders on a budget who want something simple and durable.

Sources 

https://powersports.honda.com/downloads/owners-manuals

www.ironbutt.org

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